Tag Archives: Newspaper adverts

Scrap Book Project – More Newspaper Adverts

I came across these genuine clothing advertisements in a 1965 copy of the Daily Mail which reported the funeral of Winston Churchill.

In 1965  I wouldn’t have been wearing a U.S. army gabardine combination coat because that would have been nearly a quarter of dad’s weekly wage and at only eleven year’s old I would have looked rather silly in it anyway.  I like the way the man is unashamedly smoking a pipe and wearing a hat which are details that you certainly wouldn’t see nearly fifty years later.

Although I might have been unlikely to wear a gabardine raincoat I can remember having my first anorak.  Traditional anoraks were heavy, hip-length coats with a wide hood that protected the face from the wind. The Inuit peoples of the Arctic invented the anorak as wind chill protection to wear when hunting and the hood and body section of these traditional anoraks were made from animal skins lined with real fur to add extra warmth. Fish oil was used on the outside to create a water-resistant finish but I expect this made them rather unsuitable and anti-social for High Street shopping in the UK but by the 1960s they were being made from man-made quilted nylon and suddenly everyone was wearing them.

This advertisement was for the traditional zip-up anorak with bloated sleeves that swished against the body as you walked and sounded like someone sweeping the pavement.  I notice that it claims that they were used by famous winter sports skiers but it carefully doesn’t give any details because this would certainly not have been true.  Another detail in the advert is quite shocking now with a truly inappropriate option in the mid 1960s colour range.  I seem to remember that my sister had a blue one like this but I stuck out for an olive green pull over the head variety with patch pockets at the side and across the chest.

Scrap Book Project – Newspaper Adverts

The Scrap book contains some old newspaper front pages and I will write about these later but just as interesting as the news item are the adverts on the other side.

Newspapers were once full of cigarette advertising all trying to lure people into a lifetime of addiction.  But, a significant event in June 1965 was the banning of cigarette advertising on television  and after that Marlborough could not peddle its macho cowboy image and Consulate could not claim that a menthol cigarette was as ‘cool as a mountain stream’ .

I am thankful for that because at eleven years old I was just about at my most impressionable age and I am quite convinced that I might otherwise have been seduced by the images that cigarette advertisements used to trap teenagers into everlasting tobacco dependency and debiltating illness.

It was about this time that I enjoyed, or perhaps more correctly endured, my first cigarette.  My friend David Newman had slipped some woodbines from his dad’s half empty packet and we went into the fields behind his house at the Locks in Hillmorton for an adult smoke.  David’s dad, Harry, wouldn’t have noticed a few fags going missing because he used to smoke about sixty a day and that certainly helped to bring his days on earth to a premature ending.

Woodbines were untipped and maximum strength and we lit up and I can clearly remember trying to adopt a grown up demeanour and puffing away  without inhaling until an unfortunate combination of sucking in and speaking at the same time involuntarily drew the foul vapours into my lungs, filled my brain with noxious gasses and made me giddy and unsteady.  I literally fell over as though someone had punched me in the head, turned an unpleasant shade of green and was violently sick, much to the amusement of my pals who simply stood around giggling.

I tried smoking a few more times after that, as we all did, but I have never forgotten that thoroughly unpleasant experience and gladly never became a real cigarette smoker ever after that.

These newspapers advertisements are from the Daily Mail on Saturday 30th January 1965.  Tobacco advertising in newspapers was not banned in the United Kingdom until July 2001.

Newspaper Clothing Adverts 1965

I came across these genuine clothing advertisements in a 1965 copy of the Daily Mail which reported the funeral of Winston Churchill.

In 1965  I wouldn’t have been wearing a U.S. army gabardine combination coat because that would have been nearly a quarter of dad’s weekly wage and at only eleven year’s old I would have looked rather silly in it anyway.  I like the way the man is unashamedly smoking a pipe and wearing a hat which are details that you certainly wouldn’t see nearly fifty years later.

Although I might have been unlikely to wear a gabardine raincoat I can remember having my first anorak.  Traditional anoraks were heavy, hip-length coats with a wide hood that protected the face from the wind. The Inuit peoples of the Arctic invented the anorak as wind chill protection to wear when hunting and the hood and body section of these traditional anoraks were made from animal skins lined with real fur to add extra warmth. Fish oil was used on the outside to create a water-resistant finish but I expect this made them rather unsuitable and anti-social for High Street shopping in the UK but by the 1960s they were being made from man-made quilted nylon and suddenly everyone was wearing them.

This advertisement was for the traditional zip-up anorak with bloated sleeves that swished against the body as you walked and sounded like someone sweeping the pavement.  I notice that it claims that they were used by famous winter sports skiers but it carefully doesn’t give any details because this would certainly not have been true.  Another detail in the advert is quite shocking now with a truly inappropriate option in the mid 1960s colour range.  I seem to remember that my sister had a blue one like this but I stuck out for an olive green pull over the head variety with patch pockets at the side and across the chest.

Cigarette Smoking

A significant event in June 1965 was the banning of cigarette advertising on television  and after that Marlborough could not peddle its macho cowboy image and Consulate could not claim that a menthol cigarette was as ‘cool as a mountain stream’ .  I am thankful for that because at eleven years old I was just about at my most impressionable age and I am quite convinced that I might otherwise have been seduced by the images that cigarette advertisements used to lure teenagers into everlasting tobacco dependency and debiltating illness. 

It was about this time that I enjoyed, or perhaps more correctly endured, my first cigarette.  My friend David Newman had slipped some woodbines from his dad’s half empty packet and we went into the fields behind his house at the Locks in Hillmorton for an adult smoke.  David’s dad, Harry, wouldn’t have noticed a few fags going missing because he used to smoke about sixty a day and that certainly helped to bring his days on earth to a premature ending. 

Woodbines were untipped and maximum strength and we lit up and I can clearly remember trying to adopt a grown up demeanour and puffing away  without inhaling until an unfortunate combination of sucking in and speaking at the same time involuntarily drew the foul vapours into my lungs, filled my brain with noxious gasses and made me giddy and unsteady.  I literally fell over as though someone had punched me in the head, turned an unpleasant shade of green and was violently sick, much to the amusement of my pals.

I tried smoking a few more times after that, as we all did, but I have never forgotten that thoroughly unpleasant experience and gladly never became a real cigarette smoker ever after that.

These newspapers advertisements are from the Daily Mail on Saturday 30th January 1965.  Tobacco advertising in newspapers was not banned in the United Kingdom until July 2001.